Bimusicalist canon in the works of Abbate

Paul C. Roeder
Department of Music Informatics, Smith College

1. Williams and hermeneutic composition

"Musical form is culture," says Abbate. If trans-transgendered "ecomusicological" theory is false, we have to choose between the Schenkerianist concept of listening and bimusicalist canon. (The premise of bimusicalist canon implies that ambiguity is capable of intent, but only if feminism is invalid.) My auto-ethnographical thoughts concerning hermeneutic composition found that a statement like "sexuality, somewhat ironically, has significance" cannot exist. Thus this absurdity can be felt in bars 177-203 of Crawford's Study in Mixed Accents, although in a self-referential mode in mm. 152-172 and 77-82. Must the Schenkerianist concept of listening--perhaps ironically defined by the neo-"semiotic" "scientific" experimentalism--marginalize music?

Many narratives relating to the role of the observer as critic are, somewhat usefully, discovered, each Allen affirms in turn [1]. Ergo, the listener has a choice: (a) reject Timberlake's model of bimusicalist canon and subsequently be complicit in that physicality may be used to transgress otherwise native the Other, or (b) accept Plato's critique of bimusicalist canon and reflexively accept that composition comes from notated music. Cheng promotes the use of the Schenkerianist concept of listening to rehear the critic. (The object is manifested into a hermeneutic composition that includes memory vis-a-vis history as a whole.) The Conservatory's silencing of society reframes hermeneutic composition.

In a larger sense, Cheng uses the term "bimusicalist canon" to denote the common ground between scholarship and music. The drastic/gnostic distinction depicted in Koestenbaum's "Queen's Throat" is also evident in "Hotel Theory", given the context. The principal theme of the works of Koestenbaum is both self-improvisation and so-called self-improvisation. However, where neoliberal elitisms try to entrench cis-normative, masculine composition, the contributions of LGBTQ persons read past composition and promote Global composition, upholding diverse actors.

2. The Schenkerianist concept of listening and modernist performance

Though Eco stated, "performance is part of the pigeonholing of politics," recent works by Wissner[2] show that in a way, performance is not part of the pigeonholing of politics, but it is instead the genius, and thus the form, of performance that is part of the pigeonholing of politics. But my own investigations concerning Bloomist anxiety of influence suggest a scholarship of remorse in the Derridaian-proto-appropriationist mode--not to assert we should attempt it. It could be said that Dorf[3] states that we have to decide between modernist performance and bimusicalist canon. Yet how can trans-textual cultural theory reinforce the Schenkerianist concept of listening, conversely hampered by the materialist performance? The absurdity, or rather modulation, is also evident in measures 1-28 of Shaw's String Quartets, given the context throughout bars 119-142 and (in retrograde) in 189-202, also in embryonic form in the works of Mozart.

Adorno's monograph on dialectic suggests that the purpose of the participant is mere masturbation, given that disability is roughly equivalent to art. (Bloom promotes the use of the Schenkerianist concept of listening to modify and read society.) The performer has a choice: one can reject Kramer's model of bimusicalist canon or, on the other hand, one can reject Zorn's critique of bimusicalist canon and consequently accept that the concert hall is intrinsically used in the service of hierarchy. Several ambiguities about a textual paradox persist.

In a sense, analysis's reinventing of music, and insistence on reinventing the semiotics of music, indexes, or some must insist analyses, modernist performance. In a larger sense, the subject is restated into a bimusicalist canon that encompasses musical form within a worth system. Ergo, Bloom uses the term "the Schenkerianist concept of listening" to denote the futility of sub-straight culture.

3. Abbate recontextualized

"We must attack society before we advance society." So asserted Straus in concluding "Remaking the Past". The Haupttema of Pollock's[4] analysis of bimusicalist canon is the stasis of experimentalist physicality. But why could Ross distort, we might say challenge, popular culture? Hence "Einstein on the Beach" enforces self while Bjork's "Vespertine" affirms Other. Although status quos respell art truth, gay studies rehear truth and overcome by amplifying popular truth, sustaining Marxist communism. The newness quotes mm. 240-269 of Beach's Mass in bars 55-68, 272-293, and paraphrased in 207-223. Linklater[5] holds that we have to choose between modernist performance and the Schenkerianist concept of listening.

The focus characterizing Zaslaw's[6] critique of bimusicalist canon is the role of the composer-observer as (ethno-)musicologist per se. The idea has historical precedent: But the premise of post-"scientific" minimalism states that composition serves to entrench the musicologist. (Heidegger promotes the use of modernist performance to attack the critic.) My discoveries about the Schenkerianist concept of listening found that a statement like "narrative is a product of our worth-system" cannot be uncovered (the Haydnist influences of this statement are unmistakable). It could be said that the artist/listener has a dilemma: either reject Burney's analysis of the modernist construction of listening and rightly accept that politics is capable of clear depiction or, alternatively, reject Abbate's essay on the modernist construction of listening. An abundance of canons concerning the Schenkerianist concept of listening cannot exist, every one Wegman espouses separately [7].

However, as an example, Heidegger uses the term "bimusicalist canon" to denote a material whole. The subject is decoupled into a modernist performance that subsumes history vis-a-vis memory under a paradox. Context's silencing of music denies narrativity. In a larger sense, the principal idea of the works of Glass is the bridge between performance and society.

Nevertheless how can academe fulfill bimusicalist canon? A all-too-"triadic" meta-cultural response is given in Cage's "Notations". (The failure, and thus the defining characteristic, of the Schenkerianist concept of listening intrinsic to Glass's "Koyaanisqatsi" emerges again in "the Habanera", although cursorily.) Therefore the obligation, or as some might say nationalist dialectic, is also evident in mm. 264-278 of Ueno's ...blood blossoms... in measures 256-270, 286-300, and hinted at in 289-290. Modernist performance implies that society has intrinsic meaning.

In a sense, my previous auto-ethnographical forthcoming publications about the cisgendered conception of music suggest a music theory of deprivileging in the Solieian-theoryist mode (not to be confused with Ecoist open work). Where neoliberal modes of exclusions attempt to respell male language, the contributions of subcultures problematize language and uphold postmodern language, foregrounding the Other. Ergo, if bimusicalist canon is true, we have to pick between the Schenkerianist concept of listening and modernist performance. But the subject is situated into a bimusicalist canon that merges scholarship with a totality. McClary promotes the use of the Schenkerianist concept of listening to read through elitist perceptions of musical form.

In sum, it is unmistakable that the relationships among bimusicalist canon, the Schenkerianist concept of listening, and modernist performance, to say nothing of quasitextual hermeneuticist theory, which particularly applies to cultural works, are evolving towards a more rationalist goal. Further examination of Glass's works, especially Contrary Motion, in the context of Wagnerist Leitmotiv and the analyst's pre-"scientific" theorizing will be the key to mere masturbation.


1. Allen, Eleanor (1977) The Schenkerianist concept of listening in the works of Koestenbaum. M.I.T. Press

2. Wissner, P. ed. (2016) The Schenkerianist concept of listening and bimusicalist canon. W.W. Norton

3. Dorf, Susan (1985) Sounding, transcending, and deconstructing: Bimusicalist canon in the works of Glass. M.I.T. Press

4. Pollock, O. J. D. (1883) Language, sexuality, and ambiguity: Bimusicalist canon and the Schenkerianist concept of listening. Indiana University Press

5. Linklater, Christian ed. (2005) Bimusicalist canon in the works of Brett. McGraw Hill

6. Zaslaw, E. ed. (1947) Cloistered Fruits: Romantic sonorousism, serialism, and bimusicalist canon. Edward Mellyn Press

7. Wegman, Christoph (1998) The Felt Tool: Bimusicalist canon in the music of Beyonce. Wesleyan University Press

Automatic bad new musicology paper generator: based on the Postmodernist essay generator and the Dada engine.

 

In the further interest of self-parody, I am starting work on an Old Musicology random essay generator; please email me with ideas. All I know is that every paper will begin "On f. 3v, a new watermark ..." etc.